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Propeptide-mediated inhibition of myostatin increases muscle mass through inhibiting proteolytic pathways in aged mice

Collins-Hooper, H., Sartori, R., Macharia, R., Visanuvimol, K., Foster, K., Matsakas, A., Flasskamp, H., Ray, S., Dash, P., Sandri, M. and Patel, K. (2014) Propeptide-mediated inhibition of myostatin increases muscle mass through inhibiting proteolytic pathways in aged mice. Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological and Medical Sciences, 69 (9). pp. 1049-1059. ISSN 1079-5006

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glt170

Abstract/Summary

Mammalian aging is accompanied by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle, a process called sarcopenia. Myostatin, a secreted member of the transforming growth factor-β family of signaling molecules, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of muscle growth. Here, we examined whether muscle growth could be promoted in aged animals by antagonizing the activity of myostatin through the neutralizing activity of the myostatin propeptide. We show that a single injection of an AAV8 virus expressing the myostatin propeptide induced an increase in whole body weights and all muscles examined within 7 weeks of treatment. Our cellular studies demonstrate that muscle enlargement was due to selective fiber type hypertrophy, which was accompanied by a shift toward a glycolytic phenotype. Our molecular investigations elucidate the mechanism underpinning muscle hypertrophy by showing a decrease in the expression of key genes that control ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown. Most importantly, we show that the hypertrophic muscle that develops as a consequence of myostatin propeptide in aged mice has normal contractile properties. We suggest that attenuating myostatin signaling could be a very attractive strategy to halt and possibly reverse age-related muscle loss.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:38213
Publisher:Oxford University Press

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