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Jersey milk suitability for Cheddar cheese production: process, yield, quality and financial impacts

Bland, J. H. (2015) Jersey milk suitability for Cheddar cheese production: process, yield, quality and financial impacts. PhD thesis, University of Reading

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Abstract/Summary

The aim of this study was to first evaluate the benefits of including Jersey milk into Holstein-Friesian milk on the Cheddar cheese making process and secondly, using the data gathered, identify the effects and relative importance of a wide range of milk components on milk coagulation properties and the cheese making process. Blending Jersey and Holstein-Friesian milk led to quadratic trends on the size of casein micelle and fat globule and on coagulation properties. However this was not found to affect the cheese making process. Including Jersey milk was found, on a pilot scale, to increase cheese yield (up to + 35 %) but it did not affect cheese quality, which was defined as compliance with the legal requirements of cheese composition, cheese texture, colour and grading scores. Profitability increased linearly with the inclusion of Jersey milk (up to 11.18 p£ L-1 of milk). The commercial trials supported the pilot plant findings, demonstrating that including Jersey milk increased cheese yield without having a negative impact on cheese quality, despite the inherent challenges of scaling up such a process commercially. The successful use of a large array of milk components to model the cheese making process challenged the commonly accepted view that fat, protein and casein content and protein to fat ratio are the main contributors to the cheese making process as other components such as the size of casein micelle and fat globule were found to also play a key role with small casein micelle and large fat globule reducing coagulation time, improving curd firmness, fat recovery and influencing cheese moisture and fat content. The findings of this thesis indicated that milk suitability for Cheddar making could be improved by the inclusion of Jersey milk and that more compositional factors need to be taken into account when judging milk suitability.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Thesis Supervisor:Grandison, A. and Fagan, C.
Thesis/Report Department:School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy
Identification Number/DOI:
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:40665
Additional Information:Redacted version. Parts removed for copyright reasons are: the published articles filed at the end of the thesis. See Related URLs for links to the articles.

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