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Anger, preoccupied attachment and domain disorganisation in borderline personality disorder

Morse, J. Q., Hill, J., Pilkonis, P. A., Yaggi, K., Broyden, N., Stepp, S. and Feske, U. (2009) Anger, preoccupied attachment and domain disorganisation in borderline personality disorder. Journal of Personality Disorders, 23 (3). pp. 240-257. ISSN 0885-579X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1521/pedi.2009.23.3.240

Abstract/Summary

Emotional dysregulation and attachment insecurity have been reported in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Domain disorganization, evidenced in poor regulation of emotions and behaviors in relation to the demands of different social domains, may be a distinguishing feature of BPD. Understanding the interplay between these factors may be critical for identifying interacting processes in BPD and potential subtypes of BPD. Therefore, we examined the joint and interactive effects of anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization on BPD traits in a clinical sample of 128 psychiatric patients. The results suggest that these factors contribute to BPD both independently and in interaction, even when controlling for other personality disorder traits and Axis I symptoms. In regression analyses, the interaction between anger and domain disorganization predicted BPD traits. In recursive partitioning analyses, two possible paths to BPD were identified: high anger combined with high domain disorganization and low anger combined with preoccupied attachment. These results may suggest possible subtypes of BPD or possible mechanisms by which BPD traits are established and maintained.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:41827
Publisher:Guilford Press

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