Accessibility navigation


Gender stereotyping and decision processes: extending and reversing the gender bias in fame judgements

Buchner, A., Steffans, M. C. and Berry, D. C. (2000) Gender stereotyping and decision processes: extending and reversing the gender bias in fame judgements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 26 (5). pp. 1215-1227. ISSN 0278-7393

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1037/0278-7393.26.5.1215

Abstract/Summary

M. R. Banaji and A. G. Greenwald (1995) demonstrated a gender bias in fame judgments—that is, an increase in judged fame due to prior processing that was larger for male than for female names. They suggested that participants shift criteria between judging men and women, using the more liberal criterion for judging men. This "criterion-shift" account appeared problematic for a number of reasons. In this article, 3 experiments are reported that were designed to evaluate the criterion-shift account of the gender bias in the false-fame effect against a distribution-shift account. The results were consistent with the criterion-shift account, and they helped to define more precisely the situations in which people may be ready to shift their response criterion on an item-by-item basis. In addition, the results were incompatible with an interpretation of the criterion shift as an artifact of the experimental situation in the experiments reported by M. R. Banaji and A. G. Greenwald. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:4663
Uncontrolled Keywords:Process-dissociation framework; unconscious influences; selective attention; recognition memory; false fame; persistence; objects; tasks
Publisher:American Psychological Association.

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation