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Investigating typographic differentiation: italics are more subtle than bold for emphasis

Dyson, M. C. and Beier, S. (2016) Investigating typographic differentiation: italics are more subtle than bold for emphasis. Information Design Journal, 22 (1). pp. 3-18. ISSN 0142-5471

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Official URL: https://www.benjamins.com/#catalog/journals/idj.22...

Abstract/Summary

Text designers are likely to benefit from guidance on how to use typographic differentiation for emphasis. Three experiments use purposely-designed fonts to explore the size and nature of differences in the stylistic characteristics of fonts (weight, width, contrast, italic) which affect letter identification. Results indicate that words set in bold and expanded fonts, when alternated with words set in a Neutral test font, may impair performance, whereas changing to italic does not. Possible explanations are explored through measuring the physical and perceptual similarities of the test fonts.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Arts and Communication Design > Typography & Graphic Communication
ID Code:57479
Publisher:John Benjamins
Publisher Statement:This material is under copyright and the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use or reprint the material in any form

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