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Neural signals of “intensity” but not “wanting” or “liking” of rewards may be trait markers for depression

McCabe, C. (2016) Neural signals of “intensity” but not “wanting” or “liking” of rewards may be trait markers for depression. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 30 (10). pp. 1020-1027. ISSN 1461-7285

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/0269881116653079

Abstract/Summary

We have shown previously that particpants “at risk” of depression have decreased neural processing of reward suggesting this might be a neural biomarker for depression. However, how the neural signal related to subjective experiences of reward (wanting, liking, intensity) might differ as trait markers for depression, is as yet unknown. Using SPM8 parametric modulation analysis the neural signal related to the subjective report of wanting, liking and intensity was compared between 25 young people with a biological parent with depression (FH) and 25 age/gender matched controls. In a second study the neural signal related to the subjective report of wanting, liking and intensity was compared between 13 unmedicated recovered depressed (RD) patients and 14 healthy age/gender matched controls. The analysis revealed differences in the neural signal for wanting, liking and intensity ratings in the ventral striatum, dmPFC and caudate respectively in the RD group compared to controls . Despite no differences in the FH groups neural signal for wanting and liking there was a difference in the neural signal for intensity ratings in the dACC and anterior insula compared to controls. These results suggest that the neural substrates tracking the intensity but not the wanting or liking for rewards and punishers might be a trait marker for depression.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:65652
Publisher:Sage Publications

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