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Increased anticipatory but decreased consummatory brain responses to food in sisters of Anorexia Nervosa patients

Horndasch, S., Okeefe, S. ., Lamond, A., Brown, K. and McCabe, C. (2016) Increased anticipatory but decreased consummatory brain responses to food in sisters of Anorexia Nervosa patients. British Journal of Psychiatry Open, 2 (4). pp. 255-261. ISSN 2056-4724

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1192/bjpo.bp.115.002550

Abstract/Summary

Background We have previously shown increased anticipatory and consummatory neural responses to rewarding and aversive food stimuli in women recovered from anorexia nervosa (AN). Aims To determine if these differences are trait markers for anorexia nervosa we examined the neural response in those with a familial history but no personal history of AN. Method 36 volunteers were recruited, 15 who had a sister with anorexia nervosa (FH) and 21 control participants. Using fMRI we examined the neural response during an anticipatory phase (food cues, rewarding and aversive), an effort phase and a consummatory phase (rewarding and aversive tastes). Results FH volunteers showed increased activity in the caudate during the anticipation of both reward and aversive food and in the thalamus and amygdala during anticipation of aversive only. FH had decreased activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the pallidum and the superior frontal gyrus during taste consumption. Conclusions Increased neural anticipatory but decreased consummatory responses to food might be a biomarker for AN. Interventions that could normalize these differences may help to prevent disorder onset.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:65961
Publisher:Royal College of Psychiatrists

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