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Daily consumption of a fruit and vegetable smoothie alters facial skin color

Kok Wei, T., Graf, B. A., Mitra, S. R. and Stephen, I. D. (2015) Daily consumption of a fruit and vegetable smoothie alters facial skin color. PLoS ONE, 10 (7). e0133445. ISSN 1932-6203

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133445

Abstract/Summary

Consumption of dietary carotenoids or carotenoid supplements can alter the color (yellowness) of human skin through increased carotenoid deposition in the skin. As fruit and vegetables are the main dietary sources of carotenoids, skin yellowness may be a function of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. However, most previous studies have used tablets or capsules to supplement carotenoid intake, and less is known of the impact of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Here, we examined skin color changes in an Asian population (Malaysian Chinese ethnicity) over a six week dietary intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie. Eighty one university students (34 males, 47 females; mean age 20.48) were assigned randomly to consuming either a fruit smoothie (intervention group) or mineral water (control group) daily for six weeks. Participants’ skin yellowness (CIELab b*), redness (a*) and luminance (L*) were measured at baseline, twice during the intervention period and at a two-week follow-up, using a handheld reflectance spectrophotometer. Results showed a large increment in skin yellowness (p<0.001) and slight increment in skin redness (p<0.001) after 4 weeks of intervention for participants in the intervention group. Skin yellowness and skin redness remained elevated at the two week follow up measurement. In conclusion, intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie is associated with increased skin redness and yellowness in an Asian population. Changes in the reflectance spectrum of the skin suggest that this color change was caused by carotenoid deposition in the skin.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
University of Reading Malaysia
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Perception and Action
ID Code:69613
Publisher:Public Library of Science

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