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Can temporary cessation of CBT really be therapeutic? A case study

Jenkins, P. E. (2017) Can temporary cessation of CBT really be therapeutic? A case study. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 10. e8. ISSN 1754-470X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X17000101

Abstract/Summary

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a notoriously costly and challenging psychiatric illness to treat. Despite an accumulating evidence base, psychological treatment fails to achieve symptom abstinence in many patients with eating disorders, a shortcoming that is likely to be further pronounced in AN. The case study reported here describes how a mutually agreed break in a course of psychotherapy following an initial lack of progress might have influenced outcome for a client with a severe eating disorder. The patient received 26 sessions of CBT and results, consistent with those of larger studies, showed significant improvement on primary symptom measures. These results are discussed in the context of relevant psychological theories and an exploration of the client's motivation. Consideration is also given to other factors that may have influenced outcome.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:76082
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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