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Who benefits most from guided self-help for binge eating? an investigation into the clinical features of completers and non-completers

Jones, C., Bryant-Waugh, R., Turner, H. M., Gamble, C., Melhuish, L. and Jenkins, P. E. (2012) Who benefits most from guided self-help for binge eating? an investigation into the clinical features of completers and non-completers. Eating Behaviors, 13 (2). pp. 146-149. ISSN 1873-7358

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2011.11.016

Abstract/Summary

Guided self-help (GSH) is a recommended first step in treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) (NICE, 2004). It remains unclear what makes some individuals more likely to respond to this form of treatment than others. Forty-eight patients participated in this study using a GSH programme for binge eating. Profiles of treatment completers and non-completers are compared, and reasons for non-completion explored. Completion of treatment was associated with significant improvements in mood, general functioning and on measures of dietary restraint, frequency of objective binge eating (OBE), laxative misuse, self-induced vomiting (SIV) and driven exercise. Improvements were maintained at follow-up. Treatment non-completers reported significantly higher pre-treatment levels of depression and weight concern, and lower levels of general health and vitality. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were related to perceptions of the GSH programme; practicalities of the programme; and readiness to change. Whilst GSH can be effective for a sub-group of patients, factors such as pre-morbid level of depression, degree of weight concern, perceptions of the programme, and readiness to change may increase the likelihood of non-completion.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:76104
Publisher:Elsevier

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