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Weight suppression as a predictor variable in the treatment of eating disorders: a systematic review

Jenkins, P. E., Lebow, J. and Rienecke, R. D. (2018) Weight suppression as a predictor variable in the treatment of eating disorders: a systematic review. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 25 (5-6). pp. 297-306. ISSN 1351-0126

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/jpm.12462

Abstract/Summary

Introduction: Weight suppression (WS – the difference between highest body weight and current body weight) has been proposed as a predictor of treatment outcome within eating disorders (EDs), although this hypothesis has not been consistently supported. Aim/Question: Review the association between pre-treatment WS and outcome following psychological treatment for EDs. Method: A comprehensive electronic database search for published and unpublished literature from 1979 to 2017. Reference lists were also inspected. Eligibility criteria were determined according to relevant guidelines and a quality appraisal was conducted. Results: Twelve studies met inclusion criteria (one was subsequently excluded based on insufficient data). Greater WS was generally associated with weight gain at post-treatment although not with other treatment outcomes. Discussion: The existing evidence, with data from 1566 participants, is summarised according to three main post-treatment outcomes: weight change; treatment completion; and symptom abstinence. Patients with disordered eating and greater WS may need to gain more weight than others during treatment to achieve good outcomes. Recommendations for future studies are provided. Implications for Practice: Evidence-based treatments for EDs may benefit from considering WS when planning treatment, such as further psychoeducation on weight changes. Societal interventions regarding promotion of healthy eating may also draw on these findings.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:76707
Publisher:Wiley

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