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Neural correlates for intrinsic motivational deficits of schizophrenia; implication for therapeutics of cognitive impairment

Takeda, K., Sumiyoshi, T., Matsumoto, M., Murayama, K., Ikezawa, S., Matsumoto, K. and Nakagome, K. (2018) Neural correlates for intrinsic motivational deficits of schizophrenia; implication for therapeutics of cognitive impairment. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 9. 178. ISSN 1664-0640

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00178

Abstract/Summary

The ultimate goal of the treatment of schizophrenia is recovery, a notion related to improvement of cognitive and social functioning. Cognitive remediation therapies (CRT), one of the most effective cognition enhancing methods, have been shown to moderately improve social functioning. For this purpose, intrinsic motivation, related to internal values such as interest and enjoyment, has been shown to play a key role. Although the impairment of intrinsic motivation is one of the characteristics of schizophrenia, its neural mechanisms remain unclear. This is related to the lack of feasible measures of intrinsic motivation, and its response to treatment. According to the self-determination theory (SDT), not only intrinsic motivation, but extrinsic motivation has been reported to enhance learning and memory in healthy subjects to some extent. This finding suggests the contribution of different types of motivation to potentiate the ability of the CRT to treat cognitive impairment of schizophrenia. In this paper, we provide a review of psychological characteristics, assessment methods, and neural correlates of intrinsic motivation in healthy subjects and patients with schizophrenia. Particularly, we focus on neuroimaging studies of intrinsic motivation, including our own. These considerations are relevant to enhancement of functional outcomes of schizophrenia.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:77399
Publisher:Frontiers

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