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Needs and preferences for technology among Chinese family caregivers of persons with dementia: a pilot study

Xiong, C., Astell, A., Mihailidis, A. and Colantonio, A. (2018) Needs and preferences for technology among Chinese family caregivers of persons with dementia: a pilot study. Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering, 5. pp. 1-12. ISSN 2055-6683

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/2055668318775315

Abstract/Summary

Background: Dementia is a major public health concern associated with significant caregiver demands and there are technologies available to assist with caregiving. However, there is a paucity of information on caregiver needs and preferences for these technologies, especially among Chinese family caregivers of persons with dementia in Canada. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the technology needs and preferences of Chinese family care- givers of persons with dementia with a sex and gender lens in Canada. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted through the Yee Hong Centre of Geriatric Care in Canada. Frequency distributions, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test, and multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: The majority of the 40 respondents did not demonstrate knowledge about technology to assist with caregiving. Ease of installation and reliability were identified as the most important features when installing and using technology respectively. Respondents demonstrated a positive attitude towards the use of technology during caregiving. Controlling for age, female respondents were significantly more receptive of technology. Conclusions: Our findings suggest a need to increase awareness of technology options to assist caregiving in this ethnic population and provide insight for future development and marketing of technology that better align with caregivers’ needs.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:78979
Uncontrolled Keywords:Caregiving; technology
Publisher:Sage

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