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Spatial modelling of local‐scale biogenic and anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in Helsinki

Järvi, L., Havu, M., Ward, H. C., Bellucco, V., McFadden, J. P., Toivonen, T., Heikinheimo, V., Kolari, P., Riikonen, A. and Grimmond, C. S. B. (2019) Spatial modelling of local‐scale biogenic and anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in Helsinki. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 (In Press)

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1029/2018JD029576

Abstract/Summary

There is a growing need to simulate the effect of urban planning on both local climate and greenhouse gas emissions. Here, a new urban surface carbon dioxide (CO2) flux module for the Surface Urban Energy and Water Balance Scheme (SUEWS) is described and evaluated using eddy covariance (EC) observations at two sites in Helsinki in 2012. The spatial variability and magnitude of local-scale anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 flux components at high spatial (250 m x 250 m) and temporal (hourly) resolution are examined by combining high-resolution (down to 2 m) airborne lidar derived land use data and mobility data to account for people’s movement. Urban effects are included in the biogenic components parameterised using urban EC and chamber observations. SUEWS reproduces the seasonal and diurnal variability of the CO2 flux well. Annual totals deviate 3 % from observations in the city centre and 2 % in a suburban location. In the latter, traffic is the dominant CO2 source but summertime vegetation partly offsets traffic-related emissions. In city centre, emissions from traffic and human metabolism dominate and the vegetation effect is minor due to the low proportion of vegetation surface cover (22 %). Within central Helsinki human metabolism accounts for 39 % of the net local-scale emissions and together with road traffic is to a large extent responsible for the spatial variability of the emissions. Annually, the biogenic emissions and sinks are in near balance and thus the effect of vegetation on carbon balance is small in this high-latitude city.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:84401
Publisher:American Geophysical Union

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