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The dynamic and thermodynamic processes dominating the reduction of global land monsoon precipitation driven by anthropogenic aerosols emission

Zhou, T., Zhang, W., Zhang, L., Zhang, X., Qian, Y., Peng, D., Ma, S. and Dong, B. (2020) The dynamic and thermodynamic processes dominating the reduction of global land monsoon precipitation driven by anthropogenic aerosols emission. Science China Earth Sciences, 63 (7). pp. 919-933. ISSN 1869-1897

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s11430-019-9613-9

Abstract/Summary

Changes in monsoon precipitation have profound social and economic impacts as more than two-thirds of the world’s population lives in monsoon regions. Observations show a significant reduction in global land monsoon precipitation during the second half of the 20th century. Understanding the cause of this change, especially possible anthropogenic origins, is important. Here, we compare observed changes in global land monsoon precipitation during 1948–2005 with those simulated by 5 global climate models participating in the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project-phase 5 (CMIP5) under different external forcings. We show that the observed drying trend is consistent with the model simulated response to anthropogenic forcing and to anthropogenic aerosol forcing in particular. We apply the optimal fingerprinting method to quantify anthropogenic influences on precipitation and find that anthropogenic aerosols may have contributed to 102% (62–144% for the 5–95% confidence interval) of the observed decrease in global land monsoon precipitation. A moisture budget analysis indicates that the reduction in precipitation results from reduced vertical moisture advection in response to aerosol forcing. Since much of the monsoon regions, such as India and China, have been experiencing rapid developments with increasing aerosol emissions in the past decedes, our results imply a further reduction in monsoon precipitation in these regions in the future if effective mitigations to reduce aerosol emissions are not deployed. The observed decline of aerosol emission in China since 2006 helps to alleviate the reducing trend of monsoon precipiptaion.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > NCAS
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:90745
Publisher:Science China

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