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Local myostatin inhibition improves skeletal muscle glucose uptake in insulin resistant high fat diet-fed mice

Eilers, W., Chambers, D., Cleasby, M. and Foster, K. (2020) Local myostatin inhibition improves skeletal muscle glucose uptake in insulin resistant high fat diet-fed mice. American journal of physiology- Endocrinology and metabolism, 319 (1). E163-E174. ISSN 1522-1555

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00185.2019

Abstract/Summary

Myostatin inhibition is thought to improve whole body insulin sensitivity and mitigate the development of insulin resistance in models of obesity. However, although myostatin is known to be a major regulator of skeletal muscle mass, the direct effects of myostatin inhibition in muscle on glucose uptake and the mechanisms which may underlie this are still unclear. We investigated the effect of local myostatin inhibition by adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of the myostatin pro-peptide on insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose disposal in chow-fed or high fat diet-fed mice and evaluated the molecular pathways that might mediate this. We found that myostatin inhibition improved glucose disposal in obese high fat diet-fed mice alongside the induction of muscle hypertrophy, but did not have an impact in chow-fed mice. This improvement was not associated with greater glucose transporter or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α expression or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase activation as previously suggested. Instead, transcriptomic analysis suggested that the improvement in glucose disposal was associated with significant enrichment in genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and translation of mitochondrial genes. Thus, myostatin inhibition improves muscle insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in obese high fat diet-fed mice independent of muscle hypertrophy, potentially involving previously unidentified pathways.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:91002
Publisher:American Physiological Society

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