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Interaction of adolescent aspirations and self-control on wellbeing in old age: evidence from a six-decade longitudinal UK birth cohort

Yamasaki, S., Nishida, A., Ando, S., Murayama, K., Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, M., Kasai, K. and Richards, M. (2020) Interaction of adolescent aspirations and self-control on wellbeing in old age: evidence from a six-decade longitudinal UK birth cohort. Journal of Positive Psychology. ISSN 1743-9779 (In Press)

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Abstract/Summary

Adolescent self-control is important for the pursuit of long-term goals and predicts later outcomes, but motivating self-control is essential for subjective wellbeing throughout life. We investigated long-term implications of the interaction between adolescent aspirations and self-control on subjective wellbeing in early old age. We analysed longitudinal population-based birth cohort data spanning 60 years. Data from 1,727 participants, which were drawn from the 1946 British birth cohort, were analysed. Teachers assessed self-control and mental health in participants aged 13–15, and participants prioritised their intrinsic and extrinsic aspirations at 16. At age 60–64 years, subjective wellbeing was self-reported using the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results revealed a significant interaction between adolescent aspirations and self-control on life satisfaction in early old age. Among adolescents with self-control problems, higher intrinsic aspirations predicted better life satisfaction. Thus, for adolescents with self-control problems, intrinsic aspirations-oriented educational and psychological approaches may improve later life satisfaction.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:92103
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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