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Weather regimes and patterns associated with temperature-related excess mortality in the UK: a pathway to sub-seasonal risk forecasting

Huang, W. T. K. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4292-2105, Charlton-Perez, A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8179-6220, Lee, R. W. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1946-5559, Neal, R. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2678-6016, Sarran, C. and Sun, T. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2486-6146 (2020) Weather regimes and patterns associated with temperature-related excess mortality in the UK: a pathway to sub-seasonal risk forecasting. Environmental Research Letters, 15 (12). 124052. ISSN 1748-9326

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/abcbba

Abstract/Summary

Non-optimal temperatures, both warm and cold, are associated with enhanced mortality in the United Kingdom (UK). In this study we demonstrate a pathway to sub-seasonal and medium range forecasting of temperature-related mortality risk by quantifying the impact of large-scale weather regimes and synoptic scale weather patterns on temperature-associated excess deaths in 12 regions across the UK. We find a clear dominance of the NAO− regime in leading to high wintertime excess mortality across all regions. In summer, we note that cold spells lead to comparable cumulative excess mortality as moderate hot days, with cold days accounting for 11 (London) to 100% (Northern Ireland) of the summer days with the highest 5% cumulative excess mortality. However, exposure to high temperatures is typically associated with an immediate but short lived spike in mortality, while the impact of cold weather tends to be more delayed and spread out over a longer period. Weather patterns with a Scandinavian high component are most likely to be associated with summer hot extremes, while a strong zonal jet stream weather pattern which rarely occurs in summer is most likely to be associated with summer cold spells.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > NCAS
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:94949
Publisher:IOP Science

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