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Splenic rupture and subsequent splenectomy in a young healthy victim following Russell’s viper bite

Senthilkumaran, S., Vijayakumar, P., Savania, R., Vaiyapuri, R., Elangovan, N., Patel, K., Trim, S. A., Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P. and Vaiyapuri, S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6006-6517 (2021) Splenic rupture and subsequent splenectomy in a young healthy victim following Russell’s viper bite. Toxicon, 204. pp. 9-13. ISSN 0041-0101

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2021.10.010

Abstract/Summary

Splenic rupture and/or splenectomy is/are not uncommon in clinical arena. Here we present this case of extensive haemorrhage-induced splenic rupture which resulted in splenectomy in a young healthy male (who did not have any previous medical conditions) following a Russell’s viper bite. He developed upper abdominal and shoulder pain on his left side along with hypotension and reduced level of haemoglobin on the third day following bite despite antivenom treatment. Following confirmation of splenic rupture and haemoperitoneum by ultrasound and computed tomography scans, an emergency splenectomy was performed using laparotomy. Although Russell’s viper bites are known to induce bleeding complications, splenic rupture due to haemorrhage in spleen has not been previously reported. Russell’s viper venom toxins such as metalloproteases, serine proteases and phospholipase A2 might have affected the vascular permeability resulting in excessive bleeding and increased pressure in the spleen leading to rupture. Further investigations are required to underpin the impact of snake venom toxins on the architecture and functions of spleen. However, the clinicians who treat snakebites should be aware of this type of rare complications so as to provide appropriate management for such victims.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Division of Pharmacology
Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmacy Practice Research Group
ID Code:100967
Publisher:Elsevier

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