Accessibility navigation


In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabinan and arabino-oligosaccharides by the human gut microflora

Al-Tamimi, M.A.H.M., Palframan, R.J., Cooper, J.M., Gibson, G.R. and Rastall, R.A. (2006) In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabinan and arabino-oligosaccharides by the human gut microflora. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 100 (2). pp. 407-414. ISSN 1364-5072

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02780.x

Abstract/Summary

Aims: To determine the fermentation profiles by human gut bacteria of arabino-oligosaccharides of varying degree of polymerization. Materials and Methods: Sugar beet arabinan was hydrolyzed with a commercial pectinase and eight fractions, of varying molecular weight, were isolated by gel-filtration chromatography. Hydrolysis fractions, arabinose, arabinan and fructo-oligosaccharides were fermented anaerobically by gut bacteria. Total bacteria, bifidobacteria, bacteroides, lactobacilli and the Clostridium perfringens/histolyticum sub. grp. were enumerated using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Results: Bifidobacteria were stimulated to different extents depending on molecular weight, i.e. maximum increase in bifidobacteria after 48 h was seen on the lower molecular weight fractions. Lactobacilli fluctuated depending on the initial inoculum levels. Bacteroides numbers varied according to fraction; arabinan, arabinose and higher oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization, dp > 8) resulted in significant increases at 24 h. Only carbohydrate mixtures with dp of 1-2 resulted in significant increases at 48 h (log 8.77 +/- 0.23). Clostridia decreased on all substrates. Conclusions: Arabino-oligosaccharides can be considered as potential prebiotics. Significance and Impact of the Study: Arabinan is widely available as it is a component of sugar beet pulp, a co-product from the sugar beet industry. Generation of prebiotic functionality from arabinan would represent significant added value to a renewable resource.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:13584
Uncontrolled Keywords:arabinan, arabino-oligosaccharides, fluorescence in situ hybridization, prebiotics sugar beet, RICH PECTIC POLYSACCHARIDES, LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA, OLIGONUCLEOTIDE, PROBES, SITU HYBRIDIZATION, CONTINUOUS-CULTURE, BACTEROIDES, BIFIDOBACTERIUM, DIGESTION, GROWTH, PULP

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation