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Effects of a novel galactooligosaccharide on the faecal microbiota of healthy and inflammatory bowel disease cats during a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding study

Abecia, L., Hoyles, L., Khoo, C., Frantz, N. and McCartney, A. L. (2010) Effects of a novel galactooligosaccharide on the faecal microbiota of healthy and inflammatory bowel disease cats during a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding study. International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics, 5 (2). pp. 61-68. ISSN 1555-1431

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Abstract/Summary

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common gastrointestinal disorder of cats with no known aetiological agent. Previous work has suggested that the faecal microbiota of IBD cats is significantly different from that of healthy cats, including significantly lower bifidobacteria, bacteroides and total counts in IBD cats and significantly lower levels of sulfate-reducing bacteria in healthy cats. Prebiotics, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS), have been shown to elicit a bifidogenic effect in humans and other animals. The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of a novel GOS supplementation on the faecal microbiota of healthy and IBD cats during a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding study. Eight oligonucleotide probes targeting specific bacterial populations and DAPI stain (total bacteria) were used to monitor the feline faecal microbiota. Overall, inter-animal variation was high; while a trend of increased bifidobacterial levels was seen with GOS supplementation it was not statistically significant in either healthy or IBD cats. No significant differences were observed in the faecal microbiota of IBD cats and healthy cats fed the same diet. Members of the family Coriobacteriaceae (Atopobium cluster) were found to be the most abundant bacteria in the feline microbiota.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
ID Code:17338
Publisher:New century health publishers

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