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The effects of age, enactment, and cue-action relatedness on memory for intentions in the Virtual Week task

Pereira, A. , Ellis, J. and Freeman, J. (2012) The effects of age, enactment, and cue-action relatedness on memory for intentions in the Virtual Week task. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 19 (5). pp. 549-565. ISSN 1744-4128

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/13825585.2011.638977

Abstract/Summary

The current study investigated the influence of encoding modality and cue-action relatedness on prospective memory (PM) performance in young and older adults using a modified version of the Virtual Week task. Participants encoded regular and irregular intentions either verbally or by physically performing the action during encoding. For half of the intentions there was a close semantic relation between the retrieval cue and the intended action, while for the remaining intentions the cue and action were semantically unrelated. For irregular tasks, both age groups showed superior PM for related intentions compared to unrelated intentions in both encoding conditions. While older adults retrieved fewer irregular intentions than young adults after verbal encoding, there was no age difference following enactment. Possible mechanisms of enactment and relatedness effects are discussed in the context of current theories of event-based PM.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Ageing
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
ID Code:25964
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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