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Equol: a comparison of the effects of the racemic compound with that of the purified S-enantiomer on the growth, invasion, and DNA integrity of breast and prostate cells in vitro

Magee, P. J., Raschke, M., Steiner, C., Duffin, J. G., Pool-Zobel, B. L., Jokela, T., Wahala, K. and Rowland, I. R. (2006) Equol: a comparison of the effects of the racemic compound with that of the purified S-enantiomer on the growth, invasion, and DNA integrity of breast and prostate cells in vitro. Nutrition and Cancer, 54 (2). pp. 232-242. ISSN 1532-7914

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1207/s15327914nc5402_10

Abstract/Summary

It has been postulated that the R- and S-equol enantiomers have different biological properties given their different binding affinities for the estrogen receptor. S-(-)equol is produced via the bacterial conversion of the soy isoflavone daidzein in the gut. We have compared the biological effects of purified S-equol to that of racemic (R and S) equol on breast and prostate cancer cells of varying receptor status in vitro. Both racemic and S-equol inhibited the growth of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (> or = 10 microM) and the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (> or = 5 microM) and LAPC-4 (> or = 2.5 microM). The compounds also showed equipotent effects in inhibiting the invasion of MDA-MB-231 and PC-3 cancer cells through matrigel. S-equol (1, 10, 30 microM) was unable to prevent DNA damage in MCF-7 or MCF-10A breast cells following exposure to 2-hydroxy-4-nonenal, menadione, or benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide. In contrast, racemic equol (10, 30 microM) prevented DNA damage in MCF-10A cells following exposure to 2-hydroxy-4-nonenal or menadione. These findings suggest that racemic equol has strong antigenotoxic activity in contrast to the purified S-equol enantiomer implicating the R-, rather than the S-enantiomer as being responsible for the antioxidant effects of equol, a finding that may have implications for the in vivo chemoprotective properties of equol.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:28852
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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