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Kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide during the finish-frying of commercial French fries

Parker, J. K., Balagiannis, D. P., Higley, J., Smith, G., Wedzicha, B. L. and Mottram, D. S. (2012) Kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide during the finish-frying of commercial French fries. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60 (36). pp. 9321-9331. ISSN 0021-8561

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/jf302415n

Abstract/Summary

Acrylamide is formed from reducing sugars and asparagine during the preparation of French fries. The commercial preparation of French fries is a multistage process involving the preparation of frozen, par-fried potato strips for distribution to catering outlets, where they are finish-fried. The initial blanching, treatment in glucose solution, and par-frying steps are crucial because they determine the levels of precursors present at the beginning of the finish-frying process. To minimize the quantities of acrylamide in cooked fries, it is important to understand the impact of each stage on the formation of acrylamide. Acrylamide, amino acids, sugars, moisture, fat, and color were monitored at time intervals during the frying of potato strips that had been dipped in various concentrations of glucose and fructose during a typical pretreatment. A mathematical model based on the fundamental chemical reaction pathways of the finish-frying was developed, incorporating moisture and temperature gradients in the fries. This showed the contribution of both glucose and fructose to the generation of acrylamide and accurately predicted the acrylamide content of the final fries.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food and Bioprocessing Research Group
ID Code:29380
Publisher:American Chemical Society

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