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The role of temperament and family environment in the development of anxiety disorder: two-year follow-up

Hudson, J. L., Dodd, H. F., Lyneham, H. J. and Bovopoulos, N. (2011) The role of temperament and family environment in the development of anxiety disorder: two-year follow-up. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 50 (12). pp. 1255-1264. ISSN 0890-8567

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2011.09.009

Abstract/Summary

Objective Behavioural inhibition (BI) in early childhood is associated with increased risk for anxiety. The present research examines BI alongside family environment factors, specifically maternal negativity and overinvolvement, maternal anxiety and mother-child attachment, with a view to providing a broader understanding of the development of child anxiety. Method Participants were 202 children classified at age 4 as either behaviourally inhibited (N=102) or uninhibited (N=100). Family environment, BI and child anxiety were assessed at baseline and child anxiety and BI were assessed again two-years later when participants were aged 6 years. Results After controlling for baseline anxiety, inhibited participants were significantly more likely to meet criteria for a diagnosis of social phobia and generalized anxiety disorder at follow-up. Path analysis suggested that maternal anxiety significantly affected child anxiety over time, even after controlling for the effects of BI and baseline anxiety. No significant paths from parenting or attachment to child anxiety were found. Maternal overinvolvement was significantly associated with BI at follow-up. Conclusions At age 4, BI, maternal anxiety and child anxiety represent risk factors for anxiety at age 6. Furthermore, overinvolved parenting increases risk for BI at age 6, which may then lead to the development of anxiety in later childhood.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY)
ID Code:33955
Uncontrolled Keywords:Behavioural inhibition; temperament; child anxiety; parenting
Publisher:Elsevier
Publisher Statement:this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 50 (12), (2011). Doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2011.09.009

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