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An assessment of the prebiotic potential of single and blended substrates in anaerobic in vitro batch culture fermentations using canine faecal samples as inocula

Inness, V.L., Khoo, C., Gross, K.L., Hoyles, L., Gibson, G. R. and McCartney, A. L. (2013) An assessment of the prebiotic potential of single and blended substrates in anaerobic in vitro batch culture fermentations using canine faecal samples as inocula. International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics, 8 (4). p. 133. ISSN 1555-1431

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Official URL: http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/9347935...

Abstract/Summary

Previously, using an in vitro static batch culture system, it was found that rice bran (RB), inulin, fibersol, mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), larch arabinogalactan and citrus pectin elicited prebiotic effects (in terms of increased numbers of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria) on the faecal microbiota of a dog. The aim of the present study was to confirm the prebiotic potential of each individual substrate using multiple faecal donors, as well as assessing the prebiotic potential of 15 substrate blends made from them. Anaerobic static and stirred, pH-controlled batch culture systems inoculated with faecal samples from healthy dogs were used for this purpose. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using seven oligonucleotide probes targeting selected bacterial groups and DAPI (total bacteria) was used to monitor bacterial populations during fermentation runs. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure butyrate produced as a result of bacterial fermentation of the substrates. RB and a MOS/RB blend (1:1, w/w) were shown to elicit prebiotic and butyrogenic effects on the canine microbiota in static batch culture fermentations. Further testing of these substrates in stirred, pH-controlled batch culture fermentation systems confirmed the prebiotic and butyrogenic effects of MOS/RB, with no enhancement of Clostridium clusters I and II and Escherichia coli populations.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
ID Code:35724
Publisher:New century health publishers

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