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Effects of planting density and nitrogen application on seed yield and other morphological traits of the leafy vegetable kale (Brassica oleracea).

Bennett, E., Gawthrop, F., Yao, C., Boniface, C., Ishihara, H., Roberts, J. and Wagstaff, C. (2013) Effects of planting density and nitrogen application on seed yield and other morphological traits of the leafy vegetable kale (Brassica oleracea). Aspects of Applied Biology, 119. pp. 201-216. ISSN 0265-1491 (special issue 'Fruits & Roots: a celebration and forward look')

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Official URL: http://www.aab.org.uk/contentok.php?id=373

Abstract/Summary

The relationship between food security and sustainable land use is considered to be of the uttermost importance to increase yields without having to increase the agricultural land area over which crops are grown. In the present study nitrogen concentration (25 and 85 kg ha-1) and planting density (6.7, 10 and 25 plants m-2) were investigated for their effect on whole plant physiology and pod seed yield in kale (Brassica oleracea), to determine if the fruit (pod) yield could be manipulated agronomically. Nitrogen concentration did not significantly affect seed yield and it is therefore recommended that the lower concentration be used commercially. Conversely planting density did have a significant effect with increases in seed yield observed at the highest planting density of 25 plants m-2, therefore this high planting density would be recommended commercially to maximise area efficiency, highlighting that simple agronomic changes are capable of increasing crop yields over a set area.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Food Security
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:37437
Publisher:Association of Applied Biologists

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