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Providing persuasive feedback through interactive posters to motivate energy-saving behaviours

Agha-Hossein, M.M., Tetlow, R.M., Hadi, M., El-Jouzi, S., Elmualim, A.A., Ellis, J. and Williams, M. (2014) Providing persuasive feedback through interactive posters to motivate energy-saving behaviours. Intelligent Buildings International Journal, 7 (1). pp. 16-35. ISSN 1750-8975

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/17508975.2014.960357

Abstract/Summary

The behaviour of building occupants can have a significant impact on in-use energy performance. In these pilot studies, based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model, interactivity was incorporated in the design of behavioural interventions to assess its effectiveness in promoting energy-saving behaviours. An interactive poster and an interactive prompt were designed to ‘nudge’ occupants’ behaviours towards energy-saving. The poster was installed in an office building and was intended to encourage occupants to save energy by taking the stairs, rather than the lifts, by providing them with cumulative metaphorical feedback. The prompt was installed in student halls of residence and intended to act as a reminder to the occupants to turn the lights off by providing them with an immediate playful reward. The results showed that interactivity can ‘nudge’ occupants’ behaviours when it is combined with a clear message/feedback. The results also suggest that simple immediate feedback can be effective in encouraging energy-efficient behaviours.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Technologies for Sustainable Built Environments (TSBE)
ID Code:37832
Uncontrolled Keywords:behavioural change energy-saving feedback persuasive technology
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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