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The dynamic effects of age-related stereotype threat on explicit and implicit memory performance in older adults

Eich, T., Murayama, K., Castel, A. D. and Knowlton, B. J. (2014) The dynamic effects of age-related stereotype threat on explicit and implicit memory performance in older adults. Social Cognition, 32 (6). pp. 559-570. ISSN 0278-016X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1521/soco.2014.32.6.559

Abstract/Summary

While an awareness of age-related changes in memory may help older adults gain insight into their own cognitive abilities, it may also have a negative impact on memory performance through a mechanism of stereotype threat (ST). The consequence of ST is under-performance in abilities related to the stereotype. Here, we examined the degree to which explicit and implicit memory were affected by ST across a wide age-range. We found that explicit memory was affected by ST, but only in an Early-Aging group (mean age 67.83), and not in a Later-Aging group (mean age 84.59). Implicit memory was not affected in either the Early or Later Aging group. These results demonstrate that ST for age-related memory decline affects memory processes requiring controlled retrieval while sparing item encoding. Furthermore, this form of ST appears to dissipate as aging progresses. These results have implications for understanding psychological development across the span of aging.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Ageing
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:38342
Publisher:Guilford Press

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