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Eventive and stative passives and copula selection in Canadian and American heritage speaker Spanish

Valenzuela, E., Iverson, M., Rothman, J., Borg, K., Pascual y Cabo, D. and Pinto, M. (2015) Eventive and stative passives and copula selection in Canadian and American heritage speaker Spanish. In: Pérez-Jiménez, I., Leonetti, M. and Gumiel-Molina, S. (eds.) New Perspectives on the Study of Ser and Estar. John Benjamins Publishing Co., Amsterdam, pp. 267-292. ISBN 9789027258045

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1075/ihll.5

Abstract/Summary

Spanish captures the difference between eventive and stative passives via an obligatory choice between two copula; verbal passives take the copula ser and adjectival passives take the copula estar. In this study, we compare and contrast US and Canadian heritage speakers of Spanish on their knowledge of this difference in relation to copula choice in Spanish. The backgrounds of the target groups differ significantly from each other in that only one of them, the Canadian group, has grown up in a societal multilingual environment. We discuss the results as being supportive of two non-mutually exclusive explanation factors: (a) French facilitates (bootstraps) the acquisition of eventive and stative passives and/or (b) the US/Canadian HS differences (e.g. status of bilingualism and the languages at stake) is a reflection of the uniqueness of the language contact situations and the effects this has on the input HSS receive.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Cognition Research (CCR)
ID Code:43680
Publisher:John Benjamins Publishing Co.

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