Accessibility navigation


Sibling interaction of children with learning disabilities: a comparison of autism and Down's syndrome

Knott, F., Lewis, C. and Williams, T. (1995) Sibling interaction of children with learning disabilities: a comparison of autism and Down's syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 36 (6). pp. 965-976. ISSN 0021-9630

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Abstract/Summary

Abstract—Two potentially contrasting hypotheses can be generated about sibling interactions involving a child with Down's syndrome or autism. Research on siblings would predict that learning disabled children adopt responsive roles. Studies of children with autism would predict impovedshed interactions. Home observations were conducted on 30 sibling pairs involving children with autism or Down's syndrome. Both hypotheses were partially supported. All learning disabled children engaged in frequent bouts of interaction, usually directed by their sibling. While children with autism engaged in fewer bouts and imitated less, they did reciprocate their siblings' initiations. Sibling encounters provide a unique opportunity for such children to learn about social relationships.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders) Research Network
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Improving Equity and Inclusion through Education
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:66982
Publisher:Wiley

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation