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Resting-state networks associated with cognitive processing show more age-related decline than those associated with emotional processing

Nashiro, K., Sakaki, M., Braskie, M. N. and Mather, M. (2017) Resting-state networks associated with cognitive processing show more age-related decline than those associated with emotional processing. Neurobiology of Aging, 54. pp. 152-162. ISSN 0197-4580

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.03.003

Abstract/Summary

Correlations in activity across disparate brain regions during rest reveal functional networks in the brain. Although previous studies largely agree that there is an age-related decline in the “default mode network,” how age affects other resting-state networks, such as motion-related networks, is still controversial. Here we used a dual regression approach to investigate age-related alterations in resting-state networks. The results revealed age-related disruptions in functional connectivity in all five identified cognitive networks, namely the default mode network, cognitive-auditory, cognitive-speech (or speech-related somatosensory) and right and left fronto-parietal networks, whereas such age effects were not observed in the three identified emotion networks. In addition, we observed age-related decline in functional connectivity in three visual and three motor/visuospatial networks. Older adults showed greater functional connectivity in regions outside four out of the five identified cognitive networks, consistent with the dedifferentiation effect previously observed in task-based fMRI studies. Both reduced within-network connectivity and increased out-of-network connectivity were correlated with poor cognitive performance, providing potential biomarkers for cognitive aging.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Ageing
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:69450
Publisher:Elsevier

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