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“I think that’s what he’s doing”: effects of intentional reasoning on second language (L2) speech performance

Awwad, A., Tavakoli, P. and Wright, C. (2017) “I think that’s what he’s doing”: effects of intentional reasoning on second language (L2) speech performance. System, 67. pp. 158-169. ISSN 0346-251X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.system.2017.05.002

Abstract/Summary

This study advances our understanding of the effects of task design on task complexity and second language (L2) performance. The research reported here focused on examining the impact of degree of intentional reasoning, operationalised at two levels of task content and task instructions, on language performance and perceptions of task difficulty. Using a mixed-methods approach, the study drew on quantitative and qualitative data collected from 20 Jordanian L2 learners performing video-based oral narratives and completing retrospective questionnaires. The results suggest that intentional reasoning has a noticeable effect in generating more syntactically complex and accurate language, and also influences perceptions of task difficulty. However, a higher intentional reasoning demand is associated with less lexical diversity and inconsistent patterns of fluency. An important finding of the study is that the link between the cognitive demands and the language used to convey intentional reasoning should be carefully considered when selecting analytic measures of complexity and accuracy.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM)
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Literature and Languages > English Language and Applied Linguistics
ID Code:70231
Publisher:Elsevier

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