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Study on the effect of citric acid adaptation toward the subsequent survival of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 in low pH fruit juices during refrigerated storage

Srisukchayakul, P., Charalampopoulos, D. and Karatzas, K. A. (2018) Study on the effect of citric acid adaptation toward the subsequent survival of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 in low pH fruit juices during refrigerated storage. Food Research International, 111. pp. 198-204. ISSN 0963-9969

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.foodres.2018.05.018

Abstract/Summary

Pre-treatment of stationary phase cells of Lactobacillus plantarum NCMIB 8826 with citric acid (pH 3 to 6) for a short period of time significantly improved subsequent cell survival in several highly acidic fruit juices namely cranberry (pH 2.7), pomegranate (pH 3.5), and lemon & lime juices (pH 2.8). Although the mechanism for this adaptation is still unclear, the analysis of the cellular fatty acid content of acid adapted cells and the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed a significant increase (by ~1.7 fold) of the cellular cyclopropane fatty acid, cis-11,12-methylene octadecanoic acid (C19:0cyclow7c) and a significant upregulation (~12 fold) of cyclopropane synthase (cfa) were observed, respectively, during acid adaptation. It is likely that these changes led to a decrease in membrane fluidity and to lower membrane permeability, which prevents the cells from proton influx during storage in these low pH fruit juices.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
ID Code:77050
Publisher:Elsevier

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