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Science directions in a post-COP21-world of transient climate change: enabling regional to local predictions in support of reliable climate information

Stammer, D., Bracco, A., Braconnot, P., Brasseur, G. P., Griffies, S. M. and Hawkins, E. (2018) Science directions in a post-COP21-world of transient climate change: enabling regional to local predictions in support of reliable climate information. Earth's Future, 6 (11). pp. 1498-1507. ISSN 2328-4277

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1029/2018EF000979

Abstract/Summary

During recent decades, through theoretical considerations and analyses of observations andmodel simulations, the scientific community has fundamentally advanced our understanding of thecoupled climate system, thereby establishing that humans affect the Earth’s climate. Resulting from thisremarkable accomplishment, the COP21 agreement marks a historic turning point for climate research bycalling for actionable regional climate change information on time scales from seasonal to centuries for thebenefit of humanity, as well as living and nonliving elements of the Earth environment. Out of the underlyingUnited National Framework Convention on climate Change process, improving seamless regional climateforecast capabilities emerges as a key challenge for the international research community. Addressing itrequires a multiscale approach to climate predictions. Here we offer a vision that emphasizes enhancedscientific understanding of regional to local climate processes as the foundation for progress. The scientificchallenge is extreme due to the rich complexity of interactions and feedbacks between regional andglobal processes, each of which affects the global climate trajectory. To gain the necessary scientific insightand to turn it into actionable climate information require technical development, international coordination,and a close interaction between the science and stakeholder communities.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > NCAS
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:80785
Publisher:Wiley

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