Accessibility navigation


Regional striatal cholinergic involvement in human behavioural flexibility

Bell, T., Lindner, M., Langdon, A., Mullins, P. G. and Christakou, A. (2019) Regional striatal cholinergic involvement in human behavioural flexibility. The Journal of Neuroscience. ISSN 1529-2401

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only until 21 November 2019.

2MB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2110-18.2019

Abstract/Summary

Animal studies have shown that the striatal cholinergic system plays a role in behavioural flexibility but, until recently, this system could not be studied in humans due to a lack of appropriate non-invasive techniques. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) we recently showed that the concentration of dorsal striatal choline (an acetylcholine precursor) changes during reversal learning (a measure of behavioural flexibility) in humans. The aim of the present study was to examine whether regional average striatal choline was associated with reversal learning. 36 participants (mean age = 24.8, range = 18-32, 20 female) performed a probabilistic learning task with a reversal component. We measured choline at rest in both the dorsal and ventral striatum using 1H-MRS. Task performance was described using a simple reinforcement learning model that dissociates the contributions of positive and negative prediction errors to learning. Average levels of choline in the dorsal striatum were associated with performance during reversal, but not during initial learning. Specifically, lower levels of choline in the dorsal striatum were associated with a lower number of perseverative trials. Moreover, choline levels explained inter-individual variance in perseveration over and above that explained by learning from negative prediction errors. These findings suggest that the dorsal striatal cholinergic system plays an important role in behavioural flexibility, in line with evidence from the animal literature and our previous work in humans. Additionally, this work provides further support for the idea of measuring choline with 1H-MRS as a non-invasive way of studying human cholinergic neurochemistry

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Neuroscience
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:83975
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation