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Entrepreneurial team and strategic agility: a conceptual framework and research agenda

Xing, Y., Liu, Y., Boojihawon (Roshan), D. K. and Tarba, S. (2019) Entrepreneurial team and strategic agility: a conceptual framework and research agenda. Human Resource Management Review. p. 100696. ISSN 1053-4822 (In Press)

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.hrmr.2019.100696

Abstract/Summary

To be agile, responsive and innovative seems to have become prerequisites for long-term growth and success for any organisations operating in an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) world. This paper argues that such prerequisites, in turn, are dependent on the organization’s abilities to harness team-level entrepreneurial behaviours, talents, quick and effective decision-making and related actions as drivers of continuous strategic agility and innovation through an effectively managed HRM process. It illustrates this argument by conducting a synthesized review of the literature streams of entrepreneurial team and strategic agility and developing a conceptual framework that links them together. Rooted in the micro-foundational perspective, this paper examines the relationship between key conceptual dimensions of entrepreneurial team and strategic agility; exploring the connections between these two literature streams. Our review postulates the potential value from a cross-fertilization approach and points out the future research directions through which these literature streams might be advanced collectively. Our paper sheds light on the relationship between strategic agility and HRM through the lens of managing effective entrepreneurial teams in differing contexts.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Henley Business School > Leadership, Organisations and Behaviour
ID Code:84474
Publisher:Elsevier

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