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No evidence for a relationship between social closeness and similarity in resting-state functional brain connectivity in schoolchildren

McNabb, C. B., Burgess, L. G., Fancourt, A., Mulligan, N., FitzGibbon, L., Riddell, P. and Murayama, K. (2020) No evidence for a relationship between social closeness and similarity in resting-state functional brain connectivity in schoolchildren. Scientific Reports, 10 (1). 10710. ISSN 2045-2322

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-67718-8

Abstract/Summary

Previous research suggests that the proximity of individuals in a social network predicts how similarly their brains respond to naturalistic stimuli. However, the relationship between social connectedness and brain connectivity in the absence of external stimuli has not been examined. To investigate whether neural homophily between friends exists at rest we collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 68 school-aged girls, along with social network information from all pupils in their year groups (total 5,066 social dyads). Participants were asked to rate the amount of time they voluntarily spent with each person in their year group, and directed social network matrices and community structure were then determined from these data. No statistically significant relationships between social distance, community homogeneity and similarity of global-level resting-state connectivity were observed. Nor were we able to predict social distance using a regularised regression technique (i.e. elastic net regression based on the local-level similarities in resting-state whole-brain connectivity between participants). Although neural homophily between friends exists when viewing naturalistic stimuli, this finding did not extend to functional connectivity at rest in our population. Instead, resting-state connectivity may be less susceptible to the influences of a person's social environment.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Neuroscience
ID Code:91211
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group

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