Accessibility navigation


From informal to formal: the preliminary psychometric evaluation of the short aphasia test for Gulf Arabic speakers (SATG)

Altaib, M. K., Falouda, M. and Meteyard, L. (2020) From informal to formal: the preliminary psychometric evaluation of the short aphasia test for Gulf Arabic speakers (SATG). Aphasiology. ISSN 1464-5041

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 May 2021.

886kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/02687038.2020.1765303

Abstract/Summary

Background: Speech and language therapists in Gulf Arabic countries still rely on informal aphasia and/or translated Western-language assessments to assess the language proficiency of people with aphasia. However, these tests are not sensitive to the linguistic and cultural features of the Arabic language, which may lead to inaccurate diagnosis. This paper describes the preliminary development and the preliminary psychometric evaluation of the short aphasia test for Gulf Arabic speaker (SATG). Method: The aim was to develop and preliminary assess the psychometric properties of the SATG. Three phases determined whether subtests and tasks were culturally and linguistically appropriate for Gulf Arabic populations. The test consists of six sections that assess different language skills: semi-spontaneous speech, auditory comprehension, repetition, naming, automatic speech, recitation, reading and writing. Together, these aim to detect the absence or presence of aphasia and provide a broad classification of aphasia syndrome (fluent and non-fluent). Result: The SATG takes 20 minutes to complete. It was administered to 37 healthy adult controls and 31 people with aphasia post-stroke. In this pilot study the SATG demonstrated good to excellent reliability over time and from one clinician to another. The SATG was found to have face, content and concurrent validity. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate that the SATG is a reliable and valid aphasia assessment. Further study is needed to examine the efficacy of the SATG to screen for the presence of aphasia (i.e. differentiate between those with and without aphasia post-stroke), distinguish severity levels for aphasia, and to improve standardisation with a wider range of control participants.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
ID Code:91327
Publisher:Taylor and Francis

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation