Accessibility navigation


Feasibility of a psychoeducational group intervention to improve parental reflective functioning and bonding in pregnancy: a randomised trial

Cox, H., James, A., Day, C. and Reissland, N. (2020) Feasibility of a psychoeducational group intervention to improve parental reflective functioning and bonding in pregnancy: a randomised trial. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology. ISSN 0264-6838

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 July 2021.

420kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/02646838.2020.1786036

Abstract/Summary

Objective To develop and evaluate Baby CHAT, a single-session psychoeducational intervention for expectant parents. Baby CHAT aims to improve parental reflective functioning (RF) and bonding. Background The early years of a child’s life, including pregnancy, are vital for healthy physical and emotional development. Caregivers who provide responsive parenting, enhanced through strong bonds and good RF, can aid healthy development.. However, limited interventions exist to enhance RF and bonding in expectant parents. Methods Feasibility of Baby CHAT was assessed using a mixed methods randomised controlled trial design. It evaluated uptake and retention of participants, effect size calculations, and acceptability and satisfaction with Baby CHAT. Results Participants (N = 20) were aged 30–39 years (n = 17) in their third trimester of pregnancy (n = 12). Nine males and 11 females were recruited. Content analysis of qualitative feedback after the intervention resulted in four themes; positive group aspects, group improvements, 4D scan footage and relating content to my baby. Conclusions Baby CHAT can help expectant parents think about their baby as a separate person and has potential to improve prenatal RF and bonding. However, further research is required to assess the effectiveness of Baby CHAT to improve bonding and RF.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:91660
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation