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Antimicrobial activities of ellagitannins against Clostridiales perfringens, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus aureus

Puljula, E., Walton, G., Woodward, M. J. and Karonen, M. (2020) Antimicrobial activities of ellagitannins against Clostridiales perfringens, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus aureus. Molecules, 25 (16). 3714. ISSN 1420-3049

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/molecules25163714

Abstract/Summary

In this study, we tested the growth inhibition effect of 22 individual ellagitannins and of pentagalloylglucose on four bacterial species, i.e., Clostridiales perfringens, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus aureus. All tested compounds showed antimicrobial effects against S. aureus, and almost all against E. coli and C. perfringens. For L. plantarum, no or very weak growth inhibition was detected. The level of inhibition was the greatest for S. aureus and the weakest for C. perfringens. For S. aureus, the molecular size or flexibility of ellagitannins did not show a clear relationship with their antimicrobial activity, even though rugosins E and D and pentagalloylglucose with four or five free galloyl groups had a stronger growth inhibition effect than the other ellagitannins with glucopyranose cores but with less free galloyl groups. Additionally, our results with S. aureus showed that the oligomeric linkage of ellagitannin might have an effect on its antimicrobial activity. For E. coli, the molecular size, but not the molecular flexibility, of ellagitannins seemed to be an important factor. For C. perfringens, both the molecular size and the flexibility of ellagitannin were important factors. In previous studies, corilagin was used as a model for ellagitannins, but our results showed that other ellagitannins are much more efficacious; therefore, the antimicrobial effects of ellagitannins could be more significant than previously thought.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
ID Code:92349
Uncontrolled Keywords:antibacterial, growth inhibition, hydrolysable tannins, polyphenols
Publisher:MDPI

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