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Whey protein derived mouthdrying found to relate directly to retention post consumption but not to induced differences in salivary flow rate

Norton, V., Lignou, S. and Methven, L. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6940-7579 (2021) Whey protein derived mouthdrying found to relate directly to retention post consumption but not to induced differences in salivary flow rate. Foods, 10 (3). 587. ISSN 2304-8158

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/foods10030587

Abstract/Summary

Whey protein is fortified into beverages to provide functional benefits, however, these beverages are considered mouthdrying. To date whey protein derived mouthdrying has not been quantified using a ‘physical measure’ in parallel with rated perception. Saliva flow could also relate to whey protein derived mouthdrying, however this has not been previously tested as an intervention. Accordingly, volunteers (n = 40) tested mouthdrying in different whey beverages and the sensory profile was evaluated by a trained sensory panel (n = 10). Volunteers also rated mouthdrying combined with collection of saliva samples post beverage consumption to measure retention to the oral cavity. To modulate saliva flow rate, volunteers both chewed on parafilm (to increase saliva flow) and used cotton wool (to remove saliva) before tasting beverages and rating mouthdrying. Both the volun-teers and sensory panel rated whey protein beverages (WPB) as significantly more mouthdrying than the control beverage (whey permeate). The significantly higher rating of mouthdrying from the volunteers coincided with significantly higher protein concentration in saliva samples post WPB consumption, supporting mucoadhesion as the mechanism. Modulating saliva flow did not lead to any difference in rated mouthdrying and future work would be beneficial to evaluate further the influence of natural variation in salivary flow rate.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:96802
Publisher:MDPI

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