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Double-number marking matters for both L1 and L2 processing of nonlocal agreement similarly: an ERP investigation

Cheng, Y., Cunnings, I. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5318-0186, Miller, D. and Rothman, J. (2021) Double-number marking matters for both L1 and L2 processing of nonlocal agreement similarly: an ERP investigation. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. ISSN 1470-1545

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S0272263121000772

Abstract/Summary

The present study uses event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine nonlocal agreement processing between native (L1) English speakers and Chinese–English second language (L2) learners, whose L1 lacks number agreement. We manipulated number marking with determiners (the vs. that/these) to see how determiner-specification influences both native and nonnative processing downstream for verbal number agreement. Behavioral and ERP results suggest both groups detected nonlocal agreement violations, indexed by a P600 effect. Moreover, the manipulation of determiner-number specification revealed a facilitation effect across the board in both grammaticality judgment and ERP responses for both groups: increased judgment accuracy and a larger P600 effect amplitude for sentences containing violations with demonstratives rather than bare determiners. Contrary to some claims regarding the potential for nonnative processing, the present data suggest that L1 and L2 speakers show similar ERP responses when processing agreement, even when the L1 lacks the relevant distinction.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IDRCs) > Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM)
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
ID Code:101639
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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