Accessibility navigation


Chwedleu Seith Doethon Rufein: A Single Manuscript Edition of the Middle Welsh Text of The Seven Sages of Rome, from Oxford, Jesus College Manuscript 20, Including Translation and Notes.

Gadsden, C. (2021) Chwedleu Seith Doethon Rufein: A Single Manuscript Edition of the Middle Welsh Text of The Seven Sages of Rome, from Oxford, Jesus College Manuscript 20, Including Translation and Notes. MPhil thesis, University of Reading

[img]
Preview
Text - Thesis
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

4MB
[img] Text - Thesis Deposit Form
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· The Copyright of this document has not been checked yet. This may affect its availability.

7MB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.48683/1926.00101840

Abstract/Summary

This is a new edition and translation of Chwedleu Seith Doethon Rufein, the Middle Welsh version of the popular medieval tales known as ‘The Seven Sages of Rome’. The text found in J MS 111 has already been published in modern Welsh, which limits its usefulness for those who are not fluent in that language. The only English translation available is an archaic, nineteenth century version which needs updating. This has been addressed here. Certain concepts are questioned, such as Lewis’s suggestion that the tales were the original work of a Welsh cleric and therefore constitute the first Welsh novel His opinion that J MS 20 is the oldest extant Welsh version of the tale is also investigated. The Welsh redaction itself is characterised by the usual medieval Welsh practice of abbreviation and concision. Here the translation of French Sept Sages is curtailed by the omission of direct speech and extraneous detail. Any deviation, such as borrowings from traditional Welsh tales, is therefore the more noteworthy. The pointed use of native literary tradition suggests that the author was an educated man, one not only fluent in French, as evidenced from his adaptation of the Sept Sages, but one well-versed in his own literary heritage. His exclusion of the scatological elements present in the French parent version may point to his religious calling but could also indicate that he was writing for a mixed audience: not only for men but also for women and children. The base text used here is the one found in Jesus MS 20, housed at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, though the two other manuscript witnesses, Jesus MS 111 (Llyfr Coch Hergest) and NLW Llanstephan MS 2, are also discussed. This present edition includes a brief history of the transmission of the tales from their Eastern origins to the West: to France and then on to Wales. This is followed by an overview of the cultural and historical background of the period, placing the tales in context. The conclusion drawn is that, though Chwedleu Seith Doethon Rufein, the Welsh redaction of the Sept Sages Romae, is but one small part of the international corpus of this literary tradition, it is a highly individual and therefore invaluable member of the genre.

Item Type:Thesis (MPhil)
Thesis Supervisor:Le Saux, F.
Thesis/Report Department:French
Identification Number/DOI:https://doi.org/10.48683/1926.00101840
Divisions:Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Literature and Languages > Modern Languages and European Studies > French
ID Code:101840

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation