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Integration of visual motion and orientation signals in dyslexic children: An equivalent noise approach

Manning, C. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6862-2525, Hulks, V., Tibber, M. S. and Dakin, S. C. (2022) Integration of visual motion and orientation signals in dyslexic children: An equivalent noise approach. Royal Society Open Science. ISSN 2054-5703 (In Press)

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Abstract/Summary

Dyslexic individuals have been reported to have reduced global motion sensitivity, which could be attributed to various causes including atypical magnocellular or dorsal stream function, impaired spatial integration, increased internal noise and/or reduced external noise exclusion. Here, we applied an equivalent noise experimental paradigm alongside a traditional motion-coherence task to determine what limits global motion processing in dyslexia. We also presented static analogues of the motion tasks (orientation tasks) to investigate whether perceptual differences in dyslexia were restricted to motion processing. We compared the performance of 48 dyslexic and 48 typically developing children aged 8 to 14 years in these tasks and used equivalent noise modelling to estimate levels of internal noise (the precision associated with estimating each element’s direction/orientation) and sampling (the effective number of samples integrated to judge the overall direction/orientation). While group differences were subtle, dyslexic children had significantly higher internal noise estimates for motion discrimination, and higher orientation coherence thresholds, than typical children. Thus, whilst perceptual differences in dyslexia do not appear to be restricted to motion tasks, motion and orientation processing seem to be affected differently. The pattern of results also differs from that previously reported in autistic children, suggesting perceptual processing differences are condition-specific.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders) Research Network
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Development
Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Perception and Action
ID Code:104493
Publisher:The Royal Society

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