Accessibility navigation


Home learning activities and parental autonomy support as predictors of pre-academic skills: the mediating role of young children's school liking

Cheung, S. K., Cheng, W. Y., Cheung, R. Y. M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0998-7991, Lau, E. Y. H. and Chung, K. K. H. (2022) Home learning activities and parental autonomy support as predictors of pre-academic skills: the mediating role of young children's school liking. Learning and Individual Differences, 94. 102127. ISSN 1041-6080

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 February 2023.
· Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

519kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.lindif.2022.102127

Abstract/Summary

This study investigated the mediating role of children's school liking between parent-child interactions and children's pre-academic skills. Specifically, parent-child interactions included frequency of mothers' and fathers' formal and informal home learning activities with children, as well as their autonomy support during these activities. Three hundred first-year kindergarteners were tested on two aspects of pre-academic skills, namely oral vocabulary and object counting, while their mothers and fathers reported parent-child interactions and children's school liking. Structural equation modeling showed that after controlling for demographic variables, mother-child informal learning activities and mothers' and fathers' autonomy support were positively linked to children's pre-academic skills via school liking. Father-child informal learning activities and mother- and father-child formal learning activities were not related to children's school liking nor to pre-academic skills. Our findings suggest that more coaching can be provided to parents on how to promote children's school liking and pre-academic skills.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:107921
Publisher:Elsevier

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation