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Chemical characterisation and determination of sensory attributes of hydrolysates produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of whey proteins following a novel integrative process

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Welderufael, F. T., Gibson, T., Methven, L. and Jauregi, P. (2012) Chemical characterisation and determination of sensory attributes of hydrolysates produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of whey proteins following a novel integrative process. Food Chemistry. ISSN 0308-8146 (In Press)

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.03.113

Abstract/Summary

The overall aim of this work was to characterize the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of whey proteins, through the application of a novel integrative process. This process consisted of the combination of adsorption and microfiltration within a stirred cell unit for the selective immobilization of β-lactoglobulin and casein derived peptides (CDP) from whey. The adsorbed proteins were hydrolyzed in-situ which resulted in the separation of peptide products from the substrate and fractionation of peptides. Two different hydrolysates were produced: (i) from CDP (IC50 =287μg/mL) and (ii) from β-lactoglobulin (IC50=128μg/mL). IC50 is the concentration of inhibitor needed to inhibit ACE by half. The well known antihypertensive peptide IPP and several novel peptides that have structural similarities with reported ACE inhibitory peptides were identified and characterized in both hydrolysates. Furthermore, the hydrolysates were assessed for bitterness. No significant difference was found between the control (milk with no hydrolysate) and hydrolysate samples at different concentrations (at, below and above the IC50).

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food and Bioprocessing Research Group
ID Code:27949
Publisher:Elsevier

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