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Achievement motivation and memory: achievement goals differentially influence immediate and delayed remember–know recognition memory

Murayama, K. and Elliot, A. J. (2011) Achievement motivation and memory: achievement goals differentially influence immediate and delayed remember–know recognition memory. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 37 (10). pp. 1339-1348. ISSN 1552-7433

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/0146167211410575

Abstract/Summary

Little research has been conducted on achievement motivation and memory and, more specifically, on achievement goals and memory. In the present research, the authors conducted two experiments designed to examine the influence of mastery-approach and performance-approach goals on immediate and delayed remember–know recognition memory. The experiments revealed differential effects for achievement goals over time: Performance-approach goals showed higher correct remember responding on an immediate recognition test, whereas mastery-approach goals showed higher correct remember responding on a delayed recognition test. Achievement goals had no influence on overall recognition memory and no consistent influence on know responding across experiments. These findings indicate that it is important to consider quality, not just quantity, in both motivation and memory, when studying relations between these constructs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:34836
Uncontrolled Keywords:achievement motivation recognition ability memory performance goals Human Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Empirical Study Quantitative Study Goals Recognition (Learning) Performance article Japan 3000:Social Psychology
Publisher:SAGE

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