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Automatic ability attribution after failure: a dual process view of achievement attribution

Sakaki, M. and Murayama, K. (2013) Automatic ability attribution after failure: a dual process view of achievement attribution. PLoS ONE, 8 (5). e63066. ISSN 1932-6203

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0063066

Abstract/Summary

Causal attribution has been one of the most influential frameworks in the literature of achievement motivation, but previous studies considered achievement attribution as relatively deliberate and effortful processes. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that people automatically attribute their achievement failure to their ability, but reduce the ability attribution in a controlled manner. To address this hypothesis, we measured participants’ causal attribution belief for their task failure either under the cognitive load (load condition) or with full attention (no-load condition). Across two studies, participants attributed task performance to their ability more in the load than in the no-load condition. The increased ability attribution under cognitive load further affected intrinsic motivation. These results indicate that cognitive resources available after feedback play crucial roles in determining causal attribution belief, as well as achievement motivations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Language and Cognition
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Social
ID Code:34848
Uncontrolled Keywords:automatic ability attribution cognitive load achievement motivation task performance failure attention causal attribution belief Human Male Female Adulthood (18 yrs & older) Empirical Study Quantitative Study Attribution Self Evaluation Human Channel Capacity Ability Performance article Japan 2300:Human Experimental Psychology
Publisher:Public Library of Science

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