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Orange juice–derived flavanone and phenolic metabolites do not acutely affect cardiovascular risk biomarkers: a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in men at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease

Schar, M., Curtis, P., Hazim, S., Ostertag, L., Kay, C., Potter, J. and Cassidy, A. (2015) Orange juice–derived flavanone and phenolic metabolites do not acutely affect cardiovascular risk biomarkers: a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in men at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101 (5). pp. 931-938. ISSN 0002-9165

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.104364

Abstract/Summary

Background: Epidemiological data suggest inverse associations between citrus flavanone intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, insufficient randomized controlled trial (RCT) data limit our understanding of mechanisms by which flavanones and their metabolites potentially reduce cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Objective: We examined the effects of orange juice or a dose-matched hesperidin supplement on plasma concentrations of established and novel flavanone metabolites and their effects on CV risk biomarkers in men at moderate CVD risk. Methods: In an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial, 16 fasted participants (aged 51-69 y) received orange juice or a hesperidin supplement (both providing 320 mg hesperidin) or control (all matched for sugar and vitamin C content). At baseline and 5 h post-intake, endothelial function (primary outcome), further CV risk biomarkers (i.e. blood pressure, arterial stiffness, cardiac autonomic function, platelet activation and NADPH oxidase gene expression) and plasma flavanone metabolites were assessed. Prior to each intervention, a diet low in flavonoids, nitrate/nitrite, alcohol and caffeine was followed and a standardized low-flavonoid evening meal was consumed. Results: Orange juice intake significantly elevated mean (± SEM) plasma concentrations of 8 flavanone (1.75 ± 0.35 µmol/L, P < 0.0001) and 15 phenolic metabolites (13.27 ± 2.22 µmol/L, P < 0.0001) compared with control at 5 h post-consumption. Despite increased plasma flavanone and phenolic metabolite concentrations, CV risk biomarkers were unaltered. Following hesperidin supplement intake, flavanone metabolites were not different to control, suggesting altered absorption/metabolism compared with the orange juice matrix. Conclusions: Following single-dose flavanone intake within orange juice, we detected circulating flavanone and phenolic metabolites collectively reaching a concentration of 15.20 ± 2.15 µmol/L but observed no effect on CV risk biomarkers. Longer-duration RCTs are required to further examine the previous associations between higher flavanone intakes and improved cardiovascular health and to ascertain the relative importance of food matrix and flavanone-derived phenolic metabolites.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Human Nutrition Research Group
ID Code:39748
Publisher:American Society for Nutrition

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